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Session Interaction with Quicksilver

Although it’s true that, on the whole, I prefer the OS X environment to that of the Ubuntu Linux environment I’ve been using at work for the last few months, the degree of that preference is not as high as I would have ever thought. Nonetheless, I have to confess that I have a tremendous preference for Gnome Do over Quicksilver for OS X. I know, that borders on blasphemy, right?

I prefer Do for a number of reasons that are beyond the intent of this post, but one reason is that I’ve been spoiled by having the ability to logout, restart, shutdown and otherwise interact with my user session. My inability to do so with Quicksilver has begun to frustrate me lately and tonight I finally figured out that Quicksilver has the same capability. Unfortunately, that capability is tucked away and obscured so that it’s not immediately obvious. Session interaction, as well as a few other nice tools, is tucked away in the Extra Scripts plugin.

Another of my frustrations with Quicksilver is the complexity of the interface, but I wanted to know what was in included with this plugin, so I dug it up in Finder. Since the plugin is really just a collection of shell scripts, it’s pretty easy to see what’s in there. Here are some of the highlights:

  • Get your current IP addresses
  • Eject and close the disk tray
  • Logout of your current session
  • Lock the screen
  • Switch to root
  • Put the computer to sleep
  • Shutdown or restart the system
  • Control the system volume
  • Empty the trash

More is available, but these are the functions that I thought were the most interesting or potentially useful to me. I can’t find a way to see a list of functions available in the Quicksilver UI, but if you’re interested you can see what’s included using Finder:

  1. Open the Quicksilver preferences
  2. Go to the Plug-ins “tab”
  3. Click the gear icon at the bottom of the window
  4. Select Show Plug-ins Folder
  5. Right click on the Extra Scripts.qsplugin “file” and select Show Package Contents
  6. Open the Resources/ExtraScripts directory
  7. Explore the subdirectories

Most of the scripts are pretty descriptively named. It should be pretty apparent what functionality they provide.